Carter Jonas Sponsors Grey Partridge Initiative
Date of Article
Dec 17 2008

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The Grey Partridge Recovery Project aims to restore numbers from 65,000 breeding pairs in 2005 to 90,000 pairs nationally by 2010 and to expand the bird’s geographical range.

Grey Partridge

Carter Jonas is backing a biodiversity initiative to re-establish numbers of a native gamebird which was once prolific on farmland throughout the country.

The Grey Partridge Recovery Project is run by The Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust and Carter Jonas is entering the second year of its regional sponsorship of groups and events in the eastern region (Cambridgeshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Suffolk & Bedfordshire) and the central region (Rutland, Northampton, Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire and Buckinghamshire).

It has been estimated that before World War One, there were more than a million breeding pairs of grey partridge, dropping to less than 73,000 nesting pairs at the end of last century.

The Grey Partridge Recovery Project aims to restore numbers from 65,000 breeding pairs in 2005 to 90,000 pairs nationally by 2010 and to expand the bird’s geographical range.

The regional groups organised and run by The Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust provide a focus for farmers, landowners and others interested in conservation and management to learn about creating the ideal habitat in which to help the grey partridge survive and thrive into the future.

The scheme run by the Trust offers advice and support on habitat management and stock conservation as well as regular counts and calculations of breeding success.

While farming fortunes and farmland values may be focusing on maximising production given current commodity prices, Carter Jonas and its clients see the value of the game and wildlife conservation in fostering the biodiversity of the countryside.

Tim Jones, head of the Rural Division of Carter Jonas, based in Cambridge office, commented:

“The importance of countryside stewardship is acknowledged by all involved with the rural scene. In fact, cereal fields are the primary habitat for the grey partridge in this country.

“The revival of gamebirds such as the grey partridge is one of the ways we can gauge the success of modern farming techniques and estate management.”

About The Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust
The Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust is an independent wildlife conservation charity which carries out scientific research into Britain’s game and wildlife. It advises farmers and landowners on improving wildlife habitats and lobbies for agricultural and conservation policies based on science. 

The Trust employs 14 post-doctoral scientists and 50 other research staff with expertise in areas such as birds, insects, mammals, farming and statistics. They undertake their own research as well as projects funded by contract and grant-aid from Government and private bodies. The Trust is also responsible for a number of Government Biodiversity Action Plan species and is lead partner for grey partridge and joint lead partner for brown hare and black grouse.